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PITCHERS AND THEIR NEW COACH

Communicating with your coach:


The purpose of these charts is to help your coach understand your pitching abilities. This is especially important when working with a new coach, catcher or parent that will be calling pitches. It will take a little time for your new pitch caller to understand your capabilities as a pitcher, so please be patient and remember coaches are not mind-readers, you need to communicate.  
 
After warming up, report to the coach (or pitch caller) and let them know which pitches are working and which are not. You have 5 pitches to warm-up between innings. The first should be a fastball and the last show be a fastball for the throw down to second. The three pitches in the middle should be pitches that you are having trouble with or that you haven't thrown in a while.  
 
Let your coach know if your arm is tight or sore. This may require a day off of pitching or a lighter workout. If you are having games with only one day off in between games, use the normal warmups (wrist flip, T's, K's and Three Circles) to keep your arm loose. Then either shut down pitching or throw 10 or 20 pitches of a particular pitch that may have not been working in the previous game. Give your arm a day of rest! The coaches will assume that you are resting your arm on Sundays (for school ball) or during the week (for travel teams). If your off days consist of playing club volleyball or another sport that puts stress on your pitching arm, try to develop a day of rest into your routine and let your coach know!!  
 


 
 

Communicating with your pitcher:


Let your pitcher know if they are starting a game. Most pitchers like to mentally prepare for a game. Before a game, warm-up all the pitchers you may use in a game. You never know when an injury will force a starting pitcher out of a game. It is best to have your next pitcher ready to pitch.

Before replacing a pitcher, make sure the incoming pitcher has plenty of time to warm-up. This is usually an inning or two!  
 
A normal warm-up for a summer league game should be a half hour to 45 minutes.
A normal warm-up for a high school game is about 45 minutes to an hour.
A normal warm-up for a college game is 45 minutes to 75 minutes (Kelly Franks, SPASH, St. Cloud State).  
 
These will vary slightly due to the number of different pitches you need to warm-up.  
 
The pitchers at BMP usually warm-up by dong 20 "wrist-flips", "T's" and "K's", then 10-15 "Three Circles" which usually takes about 15 to 20 minute minutes.
This should be reduced to about 10 of each and about 10 minutes total before a game, giving the pitcher more time to throw.  
 
Each pitcher is different and have slightly different warm-up habits. Try to get to know their warm-up routines.


 
 

"Communicating with your Coach" downloads:


Click here for BMP's "Communicating with your Coach" in pdf
Click here for BMP's "Communicating with your Coach" in docx